Potty and House Training Course

Potty and House Training Course

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Getting Started

Video 1 - The Basics

What You Need to Know to Get Started

In this video, we’ll discuss what this course will cover and all of the things to keep in mind while potty training your dog using the information to come.

Key Takeaways:

Positive Reinforcement: Our strategies for potty training revolve around giving our dogs some kudos in the forms of PRAISE and REWARDS like “Good girl/boy!”s, and treats. This is going to help your dog associate their good actions with positive outcomes for them. You get what you want and your dog gets what they want: it’s a win-win scenario!

Puppies Under 5-7 Months: Puppies that are under the age of 5-7 months do not have full control of their bladder so you will have to be extra patient with them. This doesn’t mean you should put off potty training, it just means that you should be ready for them to have some accidents in the house even if you think that you’ve completed the process. By teaching your dog early in life, they will have already formed important habits so they won’t go in the house once they’re old enough.

Older Dogs: Some older dogs have habits that are going to be a little harder to break, but these habits are not impossible to overcome. You’re just going to have to be patient and follow the directions we give in the following videos in the course. 

Have Fun: This process is supposed to be fun for you and your dog! Make sure to celebrate small wins along the way with your pup! I know that when your dog goes potty in the house that it can be frustrating at times, but I urge you to stay positive and be patient. It will all be over soon! Just make sure to reflect on how far you’ve come along the way!

Video 2 - Understanding Your Pup

Key Takeaways:

Download the Potty Training Calendar: Make sure you make use of the free potty training calendar that’s available to you to download below! It will help you stay on track throughout the training process.

Age: One of the first things you need to do is determine how often your dog should go out. Dog’s can hold their bladder for roughly 1 hour at a time for every month of age until they reach about 10 months old. In other words, 1 month old puppy needs to go out every hour, 2 month old puppy every 2 hours and so on until the puppy reaches 10 months of age where the maximum amount of time that most dogs can hold it is 10 hours at a time.

Activity Level: The more active your dog is, the more they will have to go out. Our recommendation is to take puppies under 1 year old out every 45 minutes to 1 hour when active and dogs older than 1 year out every 2 hours. These are a rule of thumb, so do what is appropriate for your dog as necessary. However, this rule of thumb is a great place to start!

Video 3 - Before You Start

Key Takeaways:

Invest in a Good Cleaner: Get a good cleaner or this potty training process is going to be a nightmare. One of the biggest reasons for failure with potty training is lack of proper knowledge on cleaning products. Ammonia based cleaners actually smell like urine to your dog so steer clear of those. You don’t have to use OdorXit, but we recommend it. Whatever you choose, make sure it is designed to remove pet urine and feces odors so that you can tell your dog that the house is not a toilet. 

Clean Potty Messes Calmly: Whenever your pup goes potty in the house, I know it can be hard not to get frustrated. Naturally, you may want to yell or lash out at your dog. You can’t do this or your dog will understand one of two things. One: my owner doesn’t like when I potty in the house or Two: my owner doesn’t like when I go potty at all. Both of these are thoughts that you don’t want your dog having. If they have an accident in the house, simply clean it up quickly and calmly with the proper odor removing cleaner and move on with your routine. Trust me, it’s worth it. 

First Steps

Video 1 - Your Dog's Area

Key Takeaways:

Make a Small Area for Your Dog to Stay: Options here include tying a leash to a sturdy piece of furniture, leaving your dog in a crate, or gating off a small area of the house (recommended). This area is where your dog will stay at all times until we get into the next steps of the training where you will start to introduce new areas of your home to them.

Make Sure to “Dog Proof” Your Area: If there is something in your dog’s area that might get destroyed by your dog jumping on it, scratching it, or having a potty accident on it, then make sure you take that item out or find a different place to be their area.

Barking, Whining and/or Howling: Make sure that you don’t give your dog attention if they start barking, whining and/or howling when you leave them in their area. As hard as it may be, you will need to ignore them until they are quiet for 5-10 minutes. Once they’ve been quiet for 5-10 minutes, now you can go give them tons of attention and maybe even a treat! This sends the message that being quiet is good and being loud results in being ignored.

Goal: The goal for this video is to setup your dog’s area. It should be a small space that your dog will feel is their home. This will help them not use the restroom in their area or at least not want to. We will use this area or at least reference it in all future trainings.

Video 2 - The Paper-Training Method

Key Takeaways:

Cover the Entire Area: Make sure that you cover the entire area that you have your dog in with paper. This can either be newspaper, potty pads, or some other paper of your choice. All you have to do is make sure that every square inch is covered with paper at the beginning.

Work Slowly: Wait until your dog has gone potty on the paper five or six times in the same area before you start taking up the papers that are furthest away. You want to be sure that you pinpointed the spot where they go potty the most in order to avoid accidents directly on the floor in the future. If your dog does have an accident on the floor, it means you’re moving too fast in terms of picking the papers up. Leave them there for a few more days and try again. If they don’t have an accident on the floor, after a few more days, take even more paper up until you’ve slowly worked your way to having only one or two papers left in their area. These papers will come in handy throughout the rest of the training process and are crucial for owners who have to leave their dogs at home for extended periods of time.

Be Patient and Don’t Get Mad: Make sure that if your dog has an accident in their area (or anywhere in the house for that matter) that you do not get mad at them. They are still learning and you need to be patient or you risk having a stressful time training your pup as they develop more bad habits that arise from you getting angry at them or yelling at them. Just come in quickly and calmly to clean up the potty mess with a strong cleaner/odor remover like OdorXit and stay positive!

Video 3 - What to Do When You're Home

Key Takeaways:

Get Your Dog Comfortable with Your Home: The goal of this step of the training is to start getting your dog comfortable with your home so that they feel that it is their home! Dogs don’t like to go potty in a space that they feel is their own, so naturally, if you don’t want them to go potty in your home, you want to make sure that they feel it is their home too! This is what we will do to start the training process. Bring your dog’s water, bed and toys into this new room and let them roam around!

Keep an Eye On Your Pup: This introduction process requires you (the owner) to be free of distractions. Make sure that you aren’t watching TV, doing the laundry, on your phone, etc. If you want this process to go smoothly, you need to keep an eye on your dog. The more you play in this new space with your dog and watch them roam around, the more comfortable they will be with it. Another reason that you need to watch them in this new room is to be able to track what they’re doing so that if you see they’re about to go potty, you can calmly intervene and take them outside to go. The last thing you want is to let them roam freely in a brand new room. Don’t worry, we’ll get there fast, but for now, just take it one step at a time and devote your full attention to your pup!

IMPORTANT: See the training video in the “Next Steps” section before starting to introduce your pup into new rooms. It will go over the strategy for which rooms to open up first and how fast and often to open up new rooms.

Video 4 - Taking Your Dog Out

Key Takeaways:

Take Your Dog Out Through The Same Door: When you’re going through the potty training process, we recommend that you take your dog out to potty through the same door in your house. For example, if you choose to let your dog out in the front yard, maybe use the front door as your “potty door”. Once you have decided on which door this is going to be, every time you take your pup out until they are fully house trained to your satisfaction needs to be through this door. It will help associate the door with going potty and will facilitate the training process for you and for your pup!

Take Your Dog to the Same Potty Spot: When you get your dog outside, take your dog to the same potty spot every time. An example could be if you choose the front yard to take your dog out that you find a small patch of grass maybe by the fire hydrant and you ALWAYS take your dog there first thing when they get outside, no matter if it’s play time or potty time. You want to condition your dog to do their business immediately upon getting outside instead of having to wait for them to go potty on their own time. For the duration of your potty training journey, you can give your pup PRAISE and a REWARD if they go potty right away in their potty spot, but in the future, try to use the REWARD sparingly.

Keep Track of Time: If your dog is taking more than five minutes to go potty in their new potty spot, you need to take them back inside and wait about 15 minutes. If you feel that your dog is going to use the restroom in the house during this time, then place them in their area with the paper that you designated at the beginning of the training. In this case, if your dog goes back out after 15 minutes and does their business in their new potty spot outside right away, give them a treat! They’ve earned it! 

Next Steps

Video 1 - Giving Your Dog Some Freedom

Key Takeaways:

Start Introducing New Rooms: The goal of this step of the training is to start getting your dog comfortable with your home so that they feel that it is their home! Dogs don’t like to go potty in a space that they feel is their own, so naturally, if you don’t want them to go potty in your home, you want to make sure that they feel it is their home too! This is what we will do to start the training process. Start thinking about what rooms you will start opening up in your home! Try to start with rooms that are close to their area and easy to block off. As you progress, start introducing rooms that are close together so that you will be able to let your dog roam within rooms as we will talk about in the next trainings.

Keep an Eye On Your Pup: This introduction process requires you (the owner) to be free of distractions. Make sure that you aren’t watching TV, doing the laundry, on your phone, etc. If you want this process to go smoothly, you need to keep an eye on your dog. The more you play in this new space with your dog and watch them roam around, the more comfortable they will be with it. Another reason that you need to watch them in this new room is to be able to track what they’re doing so that if you see they’re about to go potty, you can calmly intervene and take them outside to go. The last thing you want is to let them roam freely in a brand new room. Don’t worry, we’ll get there fast, but for now, just take it one step at a time and devote your full attention to your pup!

IMPORTANT: Introduce no more than 2-3 rooms per week. This is so your dog does not get overwhelmed with the training process. If you introduce more than this, you risk your dog not understanding that these new spaces in the house are theirs too. Introduce your dog to a new room for 1-5 days at a time before introducing them to a new room. The number of days depends on how large the room is. If it’s a small closet or bathroom, then 1 day might be enough, but if it’s a large bedroom or living area, then make sure you’re spending a lot of time in there just so you can be sure that your pup is truly considering this new space their home. If your dog goes potty in one of the rooms that you introduce them to, stop introducing them to new rooms until you are positive that they are comfortable with the one that they went potty in. Follow these guidelines and your pup will be roaming around the house with you in no time!

Video 2 - Bathroom Cues

Key Takeaways:

Watch Your Dog: When you’re taking your dog out throughout this process is when you will gather the greatest insights as to what their potty cues are. EVERY dog has one. Just keep a close eye out and you will spot your dog’s potty cue!

Look at Bella: Bella has some tell tale signs that she is about to go number one or number two. She widens her hips in the back and starts pacing in a slow, awkward manner. If I was to see Bella doing this inside of the house, I would interrupt her and take her outside so that she didn’t have an accident in the house. Now that she is house trained, I don’t need to keep such a close eye on her like that, but in the early days, it was nice to have something to look for to tip me off!

IMPORTANT: If your dog starts doing their potty cue in the house, it is important that you stay calm. Don’t freak out, yell, or get angry because your dog will start to associate that reaction with going potty in general or going potty in front of you; neither of which are a good thing when you’re trying to potty train your dog. If a situation arises where your dog is doing their potty cue and you need to interrupt them, do so calmly with a soft clap or say their name in a firm but non-aggressive way. Then, take them right outside to their potty spot to do their business.

Video 3 - Get Your Dog to Alert You

Key Takeaways:

Get Your Dog Comfortable with the Bells: Make sure that your dog is totally comfortable with the bells. Get them to approach the bells naturally and be okay with the sound and smell of the bells and the strap. This is important!

Ring Your Bells Every Time You Take Your Dog Out: This is one of the easiest ways to have your dog pick up quickly on this process. Simply ring the bells yourself every time before you take your dog out to go potty and then wait 20-30 seconds to see if your dog will mirror your action. If they don’t, then just take them outside like normal, but if they do ring the bells, make sure to PRAISE and REWARD them and then PRAISE and REWARD them again if they go potty right away in their potty spot. 

Use the Same Door: Use the same door that you use to take your dog out through. This will help your dog associate that door with going potty outside and also will help your dog remember where the bells are located. Your dog is going to be ringing these things in no time! Remember that you have access to the more advanced 7-Days Potty Bells Training Challenge! This will give you EVERYTHING you need to successfully potty train your dog with bells!

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Final Steps

Video 1 - Start Giving More Responsibility

Key Takeaways:

Introduce Your Dog to the WHOLE House First: Before you start the process of opening up your home to your dog while you AREN’T paying attention, you need to make sure that you have introduced them to every room in your house while you WERE paying attention to them like we mentioned in the previous section’s training. If you start this part too early, you risk coming home to accidents and we don’t want that. As a rule of thumb, your dog should be roaming around in all rooms in your house while you are paying close attention to them for about two weeks without accidents before you start introducing them to rooms while being distracted. 

Same Timelines Apply: Introduce no more than 2-3 rooms per week. This is so your dog does not get overwhelmed with the training process. If you introduce more than this, you risk your dog not understanding that these new spaces in the house are theirs too. Introduce your dog to a new room for 1-5 days at a time before introducing them to a new room. The number of days depends on how large the room is. If it’s a small closet or bathroom, then 1 day might be enough, but if it’s a large bedroom or living area, then make sure you’re spending a lot of time in there just so you can be sure that your pup is truly considering this new space their home. 

Goal: Although similar to one of the previous trainings, this is actually a totally different process. It is the next step. You have already gotten your dog comfortable with the rooms, now you’re putting them up to the ultimate test: can they handle the new space(s) on their own? If you’ve followed the training this far, then our bet is: absolutely! Make sure that if you do encounter any accidents along the way that you are cleaning them calmly and quickly with a good cleaner/odor remover and that you stay patient and keep positive!

Play it Smart: Stay at your comfort level. If you feel that taking the papers in your dog’s area up is too risky right now, feel free to leave them in there. They should be able to handle it, but if you’re going to be gone for extended periods of time or you just think that they aren’t ready, then don’t push it! However, you do eventually want to start the process of taking the papers up completely.

Video 2 - Final Thoughts on Potty Training

Key Takeaways:

Be Committed: Follow the steps one by one and stay on track! Make sure that you make a commitment to yourself and to your dog. If you can follow the steps in this course and you commit just a little bit of time to implementing them, your dog will be potty trained before you know it!

You Get What You Give: In this course, you get what you give and if you only give 50%, you’re only going to have a 50% potty trained dog. We don’t want that and you don’t want that either. We ask that you please give your all in this short training process so that you can be successful on your potty training journey with your pup.

Celebrate Small Wins: Make sure that you are celebrating the small wins with your pup! If you take a look back at where you started before embarking on this potty training journey, things probably were a lot different. You need to take some time every now and then to see how far you and your pup have come along the way. This will help you keep a positive attitude and be motivated to keep going at 100%! 

Use the Facebook Group: We put this group in place so that you would all have a resource to use that would be helpful for everyone. It helps us because we get to see what people are chatting about and it helps you guys because you can read up on what’s working for other dog owners just like you! This is also a great place to share your small OR big wins with the group to encourage others as well!

Tips and Tricks

Video 1 - Potty Training Tips

Key Takeaways:

Clean Up: Make sure you clean the area where your dog has accidents thoroughly. We strongly recommend you use OdorXit or a similar cleaner to clean these spots in order to make your potty training experience much easier.

Positive Reinforcement: Every time your dog goes potty in their spot outside, make sure you PRAISE and REWARD them. This will make sure that your dog starts to associate going potty in this spot with receiving something they like.

Bonus Points: If you find your dog waiting or sitting in front of the door you always take them outside through, take your dog to their outside potty spot immediately and if they go potty right away, REWARD them twice and PRAISE them.

Develop a Feeding Schedule: Develop a feeding schedule for your dog to help you identify what the best potty times will be for your potty schedule. They should always come shortly after a big meal or lots of water drinking. The better you can predict when either of those can happen, the easier it will be for you to get on a regular potty schedule with your pup.

Potty First: Make sure you take your dog to their bathroom spot first every time you take them outside, no matter if it is just a potty time or not. This will get them conditioned to use the restroom first thing when they get outside.

Take it Slow and Be Sure: If your dog goes potty in one of the rooms that you introduced them to, make an effort to spend more time with them in that room so they know that it’s their room too.

Video 2 - Things to Avoid When Potty Training

Key Takeaways:

Don’t Punish: DO NOT punish your dog for going potty inside the house. This will only confuse your dog and make it so much harder for you to get the results that you want with them. They will think that you are mad that they are going potty in general, not that they are going potty inside. I know that this can be hard sometimes, but it’s super important that you keep calm, clean the mess up quickly and quietly, and don’t yell at or scare your dog. Even if you catch them in the act of going to the bathroom in the house. If you do this, your dog will think that they can’t go potty in front of you so they will go when you aren’t around or in a hidden place.

Respect Your Pup’s Age: Don’t expect your puppy to be fully house trained until they are at least five to seven months old. You also can’t be lazy with your training just because your dog is a young puppy. If you let them go potty anywhere they want without making any changes to your potty training processes, then they will become an old dog who goes wherever they please inside the house and that will be much harder to fix.

Take it Slow and Be Sure: Do not let your dog out of their area and take your eyes off of them for at least the first two accident free weeks. This includes ignoring them by watching TV, doing the dishes, or any other task that requires you to take your attention away from them. These first steps to getting your dog potty trained are crucial for long-term results.

No All You Can Eat Buffets: Don’t leave food and water out for your dog all day long or they will eat and drink when they please and you won’t be able to time your potty training schedule around their meals. Of course, make sure that water is available for your dog after they have been playing a lot or if it is extremely hot out.

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